Russell Crowe brings 'Noah' to life - DC News FOX 5 DC WTTG

Russell Crowe brings 'Noah' to life

Posted: Updated:
NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

"Noah" docks at the box office this weekend, firmly planted in the good graces of Hollywood film critics and towing a deluge of outrage among several religious groups and some Middle Eastern countries that have banned the film altogether.

But let's take a step back to the beginning. After Darren Aronofsky made "Requiem for a Dream," "The Wrestler," or most recently "Black Swan," the Old Testament might seem like unlikely subject matter for his worldly sensibilities. But in reality Aronofsky's fascination with Noah and the great flood has been incubating for 32 years. It all started with an award-winning poem he wrote as a seventh-grade student in the class of Ms. Fried, who has a cameo in the film.

Now an Oscar-nominated writer-director with about $130 million dollars to play with, Aronofsky circled back to the epic survival parable with Russell Crowe in mind for the lead. Crowe recalls the conversation they had when Aronofsky brought the idea to him.

"He said 'I have two promises. First promise, you don't have to wear sandals. And promise number 2 I'll never have you on the bow of a ship flanked by a giraffe,'" Crowe said.

To create a modern interpretation that would convey the gravity of this apocalyptic chronicle, Aronofsky and his co-writer first had to figure out what their cast would say. God does most of the talking in Noah's chapters in Genesis, with Noah speaking for the first time after exiting the ark.

"There were to things we wanted to do from the get go, not contradict anything in Genesis, and figure out how to bring those things to life for a 21st Century audience," said co-writer Ari Handel.

In modernizing Genesis, the film repackages Noah's story as the world's first climate-change and renames God as the Creator, two artistic liberties that do not sit well with some in the religious community.

Weathering feedback -- be it good or bad -- is something Crowe will become even more familiar with as he leads a crew of his own in "The Water Diviner," his directorial debut.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • New York's smallest piece of private land

    New York's smallest piece of private land

    Thursday, July 31 2014 8:52 PM EDT2014-08-01 00:52:57 GMT
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
  • Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Thursday, July 31 2014 7:26 PM EDT2014-07-31 23:26:44 GMT
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
  • Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Thursday, July 31 2014 5:37 PM EDT2014-07-31 21:37:29 GMT
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
Powered by WorldNow

WTTG FOX 5 & myfoxdc
5151 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20016
Main Number: (202) 244-5151
Newsroom: (202) 895-3000
fox5tips@wttg.com

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices