Police: Man allegedly used mail to transport drug "molly" to him - DC News FOX 5 DC WTTG

Police: Man allegedly used mail to transport drug "molly" to himself

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Thomas Watson Thomas Watson
LEESBURG, Va. -

Police in Leesburg have arrested a man for allegedly sending himself “Molly” in the mail. Investigators say the synthetic drug, also known as ecstasy, is in widespread use in northern Virginia and elsewhere.

Leesburg police say the U.S. Postal Service was used to make an illegal delivery last Wednesday night on Davis Avenue SW to the home of 41-year-old Thomas C. Watson. In that delivery, according to police, were 10 oxycodone pills and 8 1/2 grams of MDMA or ecstasy -- also known as Molly.

"Once (Watson) accepted possession of the package," says Leesburg Police Lt. Jeff Dube, "our detectives made contact with him at the residence, executed a search warrant and recovered the items at that time. And we placed him under arrest that evening."

Watson is now charged with possession with the intent to distribute. That's a felony.

Watson is already out of jail.

Lt. Dube says they are not sure where the package came from, though experts say Molly is mostly made in Mexico and China and can be ordered over the internet.

"We work with the postal inspection service and when they do have suspicious packages such as these, they'll contact the local law enforcement agencies," Lt. Dube says. "We'll work together with them on a joint investigation to recover these items and make charges if necessary."

Molly is MDMA in its purest form, according to substance abuse treatment specialists. It is an amphetamine.

"It's been called the club drug, the love drug -- all sorts of things," says Phil Erickson, Substance Abuse Program Manager for Loudoun County.

The trouble is -- Erickson and other professionals who treat drug addiction say they don't know much about it.

"In other words," Erickson says, "when you buy something on the streets that's Molly, you don't know what you're getting. It might be MDMA, it might not. It might be cut with all kinds of stuff."

Erickson says drugs like Molly can alter the still-developing brains of young people.

"One of the things we're concerned about with chronic Ecstasy use is the possibility of long-term depression," Erickson says. "Nobody wants that in their life, but people don't take that into account when they're experimenting with substances at a younger age."

Erickson says Molly is addictive.

Leesburg police tell us they are not sure where the drugs they seized last week were heading.

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