A special toy store for Sandy victims - DC News FOX 5 DC WTTG

A special toy store for Sandy victims

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Victims of Hurricane Sandy will soon have a special place to shop.

In just a few days, Dennis McKeon director of the non-profit ‘Where to Turn’ group and volunteers from the ‘Secret Sandy Clause Project’, turned an empty storefront on Arthur Kill Road into a very special toy store.

McKeon said people were putting up the shelving, sorting the toys and setting up to make a toy store.

All of the toys will go to children who have been displaced by Hurricane Sandy.

One Staten Island resident Beata Cyran said it really helps for the kids to forget about everything and enjoy.

Any family with FEMA documentation, stating they had been affected by the storm, could get 2 free toys for each of their children, 6 per family. .

"I'm looking for my 2 year old and its very nice and touching that they doing this" said one displaced Staten Island resident.

Eliza Varvaro had to leave her home and has been struggling to buy Christmas presents for her daughter.

"There are still many of us that are still on stand by and really no improvements,” Varvaro said. “It's important to understand that things like this actually help."

Volunteers from the ‘Secret Sandy Clause Project’ will deliver gifts to 400 families from Long Island to Atlantic City over the next three weeks.

Denise Endall of the Secret Sandy Clause Project said they will make a route, do 5-6 houses at a time and have Santa going out every night.

If you want to make a visit to the store, it will be open from 12 to 7 pm, everyday until December 24th.

But organizers still need your help. The goal is to get 15,000 toys out to thousands of children by Christmas Eve.

If you would like to donate toys, there are a number of drop off locations in all five boroughs.  

To find out where they are, log on to: www.where-to-turn.org

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