Employers use program that detects personality from tweets - DC News FOX 5 DC WTTG

Employers use program that detects personality from tweets

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PHOENIX -

Have you ever taken one of those personality tests? Turns out your tweets may be a better indicator of your personality.

In just 140 characters, your personality can really come out.

A team of software developers made a program that creates a personality profile based on what you tweet.

We hit the streets to see if they think their true personality really comes through on Twitter.

Your tweets say a lot about you.

Some people are tweeting every second of the day. When they brush their teeth, eat breakfast," said Caiti Currey.

IBM developers say they can create personality profiles based on people's Twitter accounts.

They analyzed 300 Twitter profiles and had those same users take personality tests.

According to IBM, there was a close connection between the two more than 80 percent of the time.

"A lot of times people tweet things they feel and won't really say in person," said Hailey Christopher.       

What do your tweets say about you?

If you use words like "we," "friends" and "family" you tend to be a more caring person.

People who tweet longer words are more likely to get along with their coworkers.

If you used the word "school" in your last tweet, you're independent.

Not surprisingly, people who use the word "perfect" in their tweets tend to be perfectionists.

"Some people get really personal on Twitter and you can see the type of person they are. I think if someone looked at my tweets they would think that I'm funny and sassy," said Taylor Loomis.

This personality profiling technology is being used to help employers to get a sense of potential job candidates before even meeting them.

It could help whittle down the number of candidates or maybe be a deciding factor in who gets the job.

The program could help employers pick people with the right personality for the job and avoid people who might not be the right fit.

That has Twitter users being more careful about what they tweet.

"Colleges look at it, jobs look at it. I don't think you put anything R-rated," said Loomis.

I know people are allowed to give their opinions, but certain things are just offensive," said Currey.

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