NJ voting to lighten medical marijuana law - DC News FOX 5 DC WTTG

NJ voting to lighten medical marijuana law

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New Jersey will vote on changing its medical marijuana laws that could make it easier for sick children to gain access to the drug.

The Assembly is scheduled to vote on Monday, September 7 and according to Ken Wolski, Executive Director for the Coalition for Medical Marijuana in New Jersey, the change would allow alternative treatment clinics to have types of cannabis mostly likely to help patients with different conditions.

The measure would also eliminate a regulation that allows licensed dispensaries to grow more than three strains of cannabis.

Advocates say that will allow growers to provide different types of marijuana that could help people with specific medical conditions, including children.

Wolski said research has found that different strains can help with different conditions and symptoms as some can control nausea and others can control pain or reduce convulsions.

Last month, Governor Chris Christie issued a conditional veto and agreed to end the cap on the number of strains that growers can provide and to allow them to sell edible forms of marijuana to young patients.

However, Christie struck a change that would have let sick children get medical pot with the approval of just one doctor, just like adults. Now, they will need at least two doctors or more in some cases, to sign off.

The state Senate has already adopted the governor’s version and the Assembly is will now vote on it. If the Assembly passes the bill, it goes back to Christie for his signature.


The Associate Press contributed to this story
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