CVS requiring ID for purchase of nail polish remover in effort t - DC News FOX 5 DC WTTG

CVS requiring ID for purchase of nail polish remover in effort to reduce illegal meth production

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If you want to buy nail polish remover from a CVS drug store, you will soon have to show photo identification. That is because acetone in nail polish remover can be used to make the dangerous drug methamphetamine.

The drug store has already launched the policy in southern New England and plans to initiate it nationwide in the coming weeks.

FOX 5 spoke to a recovering meth addict, who says it is no secret that acetone can be used to break down crystal meth into a liquid form or back into a crystalized rock form.

Marvin Weaver says meth has terrible side effects and he doesn't intend to use the drug again. He says CVS is on the right road of trying to "put a stop to the circle, put a block in the whole circle of getting it made."

Bill Prasad, a clinical supervisor at Phoenix House, says meth damages the brain and heart as well as causes tooth decay.

"One of the other things we see with methamphetamine users is sometimes they have the feeling that something is crawling on their skin. They will start to pick at their skin,” he said.

This is not the first time drug stores have restricted access to a drug used to make meth. Federal law requires that they stock Sudafed behind the counter.

Statement from Mike DeAngelis, Director of Public Relations for CVS/pharmacy:

"Because acetone is an ingredient used in the illegal manufacture of methamphetamine, we recently implemented a policy that a valid ID must be presented to purchase acetone-containing products such as nail polish remover. Our policy also limits the sale of these products in conjunction with other methamphetamine precursors and is based on various regulations requiring retailers to record sales of acetone (see attached section from the Code of Federal Regulations). We are in the process of implementing this in all stores."

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