Border security at issue in immigration bill - DC News FOX 5 DC WTTG

Border security at issue in immigration bill

Posted: Updated:
  • ImmigrationMore>>

  • Back to school even in Texas immigration prison

    Back to school even in Texas immigration prison

    For about 200 immigrant children held with their mothers, life inside a South Texas federal immigration prison means going to school eight hours a day.
    For about 200 immigrant children held with their mothers, life inside a South Texas federal immigration prison means going to school eight hours a day.
  • Deportations down 20 percent, fewest since 2007

    Deportations down 20 percent, fewest since 2007

    Friday, September 12 2014 4:29 PM EDT2014-09-12 20:29:39 GMT
    President Barack Obama has quietly slowed deportations by nearly 20 percent while delaying plans to act on his own potentially to shield millions of immigrants from expulsion.
    President Barack Obama has quietly slowed deportations by nearly 20 percent while delaying plans to act on his own potentially to shield millions of immigrants from expulsion.
  • Report: Border Patrol housing poorly planned

    Report: Border Patrol housing poorly planned

    A report by the federal Department of Homeland Security has found the parent agency of the Border Patrol mishandled a housing project for agents in Ajo, Arizona.
    A report by the federal Department of Homeland Security has found the parent agency of the Border Patrol mishandled a housing project for agents in Ajo, Arizona.

By DAVID ESPO AP Special Correspondent

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Bickering across a deep divide, supporters of immigration legislation pushed back hard Wednesday against Republican demands for tougher border security measures before millions living illegally in the country could take the first steps toward U.S. citizenship.

Even uncontroversial changes were snared in the political crossfire that erupted on the first full day of debate on the measure, as the two sides failed to agree on terms for voting on seemingly non-controversial proposals such as granting tribal officials a place on a Border Oversight Task Force.

Public polling shows general support both for tougher border security and for allowing those living in the United States to gain citizenship after meeting certain legal, financial and other conditions. On an issue as contentious as immigration, that made the intersection of the two a fertile ground for dispute.

As drafted, the legislation "authorizes a permanent legalization program for illegal immigrants regardless of whether the Mexican border is ever secured," said Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas. The Senate's second-ranking leader also wants other measures implemented, including a biometric system to check everyone departing the country at a sea or airport, that Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said could take a quarter-century to take effect fully.

"We cannot, should not and will not tell those who have waited in the shadows for so long that they should wait for 25 years," said Schumer, who was part of a bipartisan "Gang of Eight" group of senators who negotiated the bill's basic provisions and then protected it from major changes in the Judiciary Committee last month.

In addition to taking steps to secure the border and begin a legalization process for millions, the White House-backed legislation would increase the number of visas for highly skilled workers, create a new program for the lesser-skilled to work in the United States and overturn a family-based system for legal immigration that has been in place for decades.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., has said he wants a final vote on the measure before July 4.

Across the Capitol, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, says he hopes immigration legislation can move through committee by then, and be on the floor sometime in July.

While the obstacles to a final agreement are daunting, the Senate bill has support from both business and organized labor, two groups that are usually on opposite sides of most issues.

Additionally, senior Republicans have made it clear they envision the legislation as a way for the party to show a friendlier face to Hispanic voters, who overwhelmingly supported President Barack Obama last fall.

Even some GOP lawmakers who seem unlikely to vote for the Senate bill are recalibrating their rhetoric.

One, Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, told a Hispanic audience during the day that conservatives could accept a pathway to citizenship as long as the border security measures are tough enough.

"The first part of my plan -- border security -- must be certified by Border Patrol and an Investigator General and then voted on by Congress to ensure it has been accomplished," he said. "With this in place, I believe conservatives will accept what needs to come next, an issue that must be addressed: What becomes of the 12 million undocumented workers in the United States?"

While Paul spoke to an immigration forum held by the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference and Latino Partnership for Conservative Principles, Cornyn was making his case for changes to the bill from his desk on the Senate floor.

"My amendment has real border security triggers in place, while the Gang of Eight bill" lacks them, he said. He added that under the bill as drafted, there was no way to tell whether the goals for border security would ever be met.

A second amendment, offered by Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, would prohibit anyone from taking the first steps toward citizenship until the secretary of homeland security has certified to Congress that the U.S.-Mexico border has been under control for six months.

"Unfortunately, too many people have been led to believe that this bill will force the secretary of homeland security to secure the border. In fact, it does not guarantee that before legalization," said Grassley, the top Republican on the Judiciary Committee.

Didn't find what
you were looking for?

  • Viral StoriesMore>>

  • Drones get more space to roam over Texas: FAA approves runway for unmanned aircrafts

    Drones get more space to roam over Texas: FAA approves runway for unmanned aircrafts

    Monday, September 15 2014 10:06 AM EDT2014-09-15 14:06:39 GMT
    The skies over South Texas are about to get a lot more crowded after drone researchers at a Texas university were granted more airspace to test and fly their unmanned aircraft. The Federal Aviation Administration recently approved a new range for the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center at Texas AM University-Corpus Christi, providing the researchers with around 290 flying days a year over mountains, high deserts, agriculture, coastal and maritime topographies, including the...
    The skies over South Texas are about to get a lot more crowded after drone researchers at a Texas university were granted more airspace to test and fly their unmanned aircraft. The Federal Aviation Administration recently approved a new range for the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center at Texas AM University-Corpus Christi, providing the researchers with around 290 flying days a year over mountains, high deserts, agriculture, coastal and maritime topographies, including the...
  • Kids' poisonings linked to anti-addiction medicine

    Kids' poisonings linked to anti-addiction medicine

    Monday, September 15 2014 9:31 AM EDT2014-09-15 13:31:20 GMT
    CHICAGO (AP) -- An anti-addiction drug used to fight the nation's heroin and painkiller abuse epidemics poses a threat to young children who accidentally swallow relatives' prescriptions, a federal study says. Some children have died. The study found that the drug, buprenorphine, was the adult prescription medication most commonly implicated in emergency hospitalizations of children aged 6 and younger. For every 100,000 patients prescribed buprenorphine, 200 young children were hospitalized ...
    CHICAGO (AP) -- An anti-addiction drug used to fight the nation's heroin and painkiller abuse epidemics poses a threat to young children who accidentally swallow relatives' prescriptions, a federal study says. Some children have died. The study found that the drug, buprenorphine, was the adult prescription medication most commonly implicated in emergency hospitalizations of children aged 6 and younger. For every 100,000 patients prescribed buprenorphine, 200 young children were hospitalized ...
  • Ravens fans, men and women, wear Ray Rice jerseys at Thursday night game

    Ravens fans, men and women, wear Ray Rice jerseys at Thursday night game

    Thursday, September 11 2014 11:18 PM EDT2014-09-12 03:18:32 GMT
    Music blared from the purple bus, and Baltimore Ravens fan Racquel Bailey stood with drink in hand amid her usual tailgate buddies while making a bold fashion statement: a black, rhinestone-decorated jersey with the white No. 27. A Ray Rice jersey.
    Music blared from the purple bus, and Baltimore Ravens fan Racquel Bailey stood with drink in hand amid her usual tailgate buddies while making a bold fashion statement: a black, rhinestone-decorated jersey with the white No. 27. A Ray Rice jersey.
Powered by WorldNow
Untitled

WTTG FOX 5 & myfoxdc
5151 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20016
Main Number: (202) 244-5151
Newsroom: (202) 895-3000
fox5tips@wttg.com

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices