Light snow causes issues on roads, early school closings in DC - DC News FOX 5 DC WTTG

Light snow causes issues on roads, early school closings in DC region

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WASHINGTON -

Light snow has come through the D.C. area Friday afternoon and evening causing some issues on the roads during the rush hour commute as well as early school closings in the area.

District of Columbia officials say the city's snow team has been treating residential streets and monitoring major streets in anticipation of Friday's winter weather.

Much of Virginia is bracing for low temperatures and snowfall heading into the weekend.

The National Weather Service has issued a winter weather advisory for most of Virginia into Friday evening and early Saturday.

Virginia Department of Transportation says crews are working around the clock to treat and clear state-maintained roads.

Virginia State Police say troopers responded to nearly 250 traffic crashes and about 175 disabled vehicles through Friday evening.

Media outlets report that the forecast calls for 1 to 2 inches of snow in the Richmond metro area. Southside and southeastern Virginia could get 2 to 3 inches and snowfall totals are estimated in western and Southwest Virginia to be between 1 to 4 inches. The snow is expected to accumulate on all surfaces as temperatures remain below freezing.

A winter storm is making highways hazardous for afternoon commuters.

Maryland State Police reported numerous minor accidents Friday on Interstates 70 and 68 amid snowy, windy conditions.

The National Weather Service has issued a winter weather advisory for most of Maryland. It says up to three inches of snow could fall Friday afternoon and evening east of Garrett County.

Garrett County could get four to six inches by Saturday night.

The foul weather prompted early school closings in many counties.


ACCUWEATHER - Snow, a wintry mix and the associated slippery travel will stretch over a broad area with the next storm from the Midwest to the interior South and much of the mid-Atlantic to end the week.

Enough snow to make for slippery travel is heading from Duluth, Minn. to Detroit, Cincinnati and Cleveland in the Midwest and from Pittsburgh to Roanoke, Philadelphia, Richmond, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., in the mid-Atlantic. New York City will be on the northern edge of the accumulating snow.

Enough icy precipitation will fall for icy travel in London, Ky., Nashville, Knoxville, Charlotte, Raleigh and Norfolk.

A broad area of a coating to 3 inches of snow will stretch from northern Minnesota to the eastern part of the Ohio Valley, part of the Tennessee Valley, the central and southern Appalachians and on to the mid-Atlantic coast.

A few locations within this area will receive a bit more due to local effects and a banded structure to the shield of snow that often occurs with Alberta Clippers. Up to half a foot of snow will fall over the mountains of West Virginia, northwestern Virginia, western Maryland and southwestern Pennsylvania, due to orographic effects.

Because of the recent cold weather, much of the snow that falls will not melt on paved and concrete surfaces.

The snow will be dry and powdery in many areas, what meteorologists call a high-ratio snow. This simply means a small amount of moisture can lead to a moderate amount of snow. A tenth of an inch of water can produce 2 or 3 inches, instead of the more typical 1 inch for the same moisture in an average storm setup.

Farther south, enough warm air will stream in aloft, while cold air hangs on near the surface to bring a zone of sleet, freezing rain or a mixture containing snow, ice and plain rain.

A several-hour period of ice or a wintry mix will stretch from northern Arkansas and southeastern Missouri to southwestern Kentucky, northern and eastern Tennessee, northern Georgia, upstate South Carolina, a large part of North Carolina and the southeastern corner of Virginia.

Cities from Bowling Green, Ky. and Knoxville, Tenn. to Greenville, S.C., Charlotte and Elizabeth City, N.C. are in for several hours of ice, which includes freezing rain and/or sleet.

The extent of the arctic air will force the storm south of much of northern upstate New York and New England. However, enough snow can fall to bring a small accumulation to southern New England.

Milder weather is forecast to return to the Midwest, South and Northeast briefly next week. However, the transition may come at a cost. A period of sleet and freezing rain is forecast for some locations.

Arctic air will return from the northern Plains to the Northeast just past the start of February.

The latest advisories and national and international forecasts can be found on AccuWeather.com.


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